Day Twenty, Philippi, Neapolis, Kavala, Greece

December 02, 2012  •  Leave a Comment

I really enjoyed my visit to Philippi. There was much to see and photograph.

Archaeological work has revealed a large and well-preserved forum, a theater, the alleged jail of Paul and several Byzantine churches, including one of the earliest churches known in Greece.  The number of churches in the city in the Byzantine period indicate Philippi's importance to Christians at this time.  A series of earthquakes apparently destroyed many of the buildings and probably contributed to the city's decline.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Philippi Theater

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

You can see here about 1/4 of the excavations.  

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Directly in front where the closest pillars are was a Temple and off in the distance was a basilica. 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Here is "Basilica B"

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Inscription in western Philippi mentioning the Province of Macedonia.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I found this spear and shield fascinating.  I was once adorning the outside of a building just under the peak of the roof.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Philippi apparently had only a small number of Jewish inhabitants and no synagogue. Consequently Shabbat worship was held outside the city on the Gangitis River.  Here Paul met a group of women to whom he preached the gospel.  Lydia, a merchant trading purple cloth, believed Paul's message and was baptized with members of her household.  Subsequently Paul went and lived at her home. 

~~~~~~~~~~~

This is the inside dome of the church that honours Lydia.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Kavala is the site of ancient Neapolis where Paul's boat landed on his way to Philippi.

~~~~~~~~~~~

The Kavala aqueduct, popularly known as the Kamares (Greek: Καμάρες, "arches"), is a well-preserved aqueduct in the city of Kavala, Greece, and is one of the city's landmarks.
While the aqueduct is "probably of Roman origin", the present structure dates to the 16th century. A Byzantine barrier wall of the early 14th century, built as part of the fortifications on the Kavala acropolis, probably also functioned as an aqueduct. This would have made it one of the few examples of Byzantine aqueducts, since Byzantine cities more typically used wells and cisterns rather than either maintaining existing Roman aqueducts or building new ones. The barrier wall was replaced with the present arched aqueduct during Suleiman the Magnificent's repair and improvement of the Byzantine fortifications. Some authors date that construction to the time of the 1522 Siege of Rhodes, but a more likely date is between 1530 and 1536. As late as 1911, it was still being used to supply the city with drinking water from Mount Pangaeus.

~~~~~~~~~~~

The "Lion of Amphipolis" with Hercules standing before him.... well, actually, the small human figure is me...

After preaching the gospel in Philippi, Paul passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia with Silas during his second missionary journey, traveling on the Ignatia Way from Philippi to Thessalonica (Acts 17:1). Amphipolis was one of the most important cities of Macedonia in antiquity. The "Lion of Amphipolis" has been dated from the fourth century B.C. It stands on a restored pedestal on the very spot where it's broken and scattered pieces were found. It was either a funerary monument or a monument erected to commemorate some as yet unidentified military victory.


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...

If you've enjoyed my blog... please share it.

At the bottom of each blog is a FaceBook "Like" button as well as the Twitter and G+1 button - Thanks

To see all my other "Image Galleries" and video work click on the appropriate link at the very top or bottom of the page.

Subscribe
RSS
Archive
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December