Day Eleven, Adana, Tarsus, Goreme, Turkey

November 25, 2012  •  Leave a Comment

Started the day off in Adana, Turkey.  The two main land marks are the Roman Bridge and the Mosque.

This is a stone bridge on the Seyhan River in Adana, Turkey that was built by the Romans.  It is also the oldest bridge that is still in use. Paul was likely here planting churches and would have walked over this Bridge.  Acts 15:23, 41

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SABANCI MOSQUE was built between 1988 - 1998. It is the largest mosque in the Middle-east and Balkans

 

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Next we went Tarsus where the apostle Paul was from.  This is the entrance to Saint Paul's Church. According to tradition the building date of the Saint Paul Church is 1102, but the present structure, a domeless basilica, was built (or rebuilt) much later, in 1862.

BIBLEL LINKS TO EVERYTHING TARSUS

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Little of Tarsus from the time of Paul has been excavated due to the location of the modern city of Cumhuriyet Alani atop the ruins. Excavations have turned up a paved city street of Tarsus along with a colonnaded podium, which may date to the 2nd century BC.  In addition, remains have been found from the Bronze Age, baths, a Hellenistic portico, a Roman theater, and many terracotta figurines of deities, animals, people, and various mythological creatures.

During this time of Pompey (67 BC), Tarsus was made capital over the Roman province of Cilicia, and Jews began to receive Roman citizenship. Antony, who controlled the eastern provinces, declared the city free in 42 BC. Tarsus continued to receive special privileges under Augustus, who exempted the city from imperial taxation because Athenodorus, his teacher and friend, was a Tarsian. Tarsus grew into a cultural and intellectual center. Stoic philosophers like Athenodorus, Zeno, Antipater, and Nestor lived in the city in the first century AD.

I placed the bible on the road that Paul would have walked on.

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The Cydnus River flows through Tarsus, south-eastern Turkey, and used to enter the Mediterranean Sea just south of the town. The Byzantine Emperor Justinian in (527 - 565 AD) rerouted the river through an old Roman grave yard.

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Later that night we arrived in Goreme, Turey. I took the opportunity to photograph these natural structures lit up in a foggy sky. Many people still live in cave homes.  Had a nice meal and sleep in a one of the caves.  Here you can see homes and hotels built into these most unique hills.  In the next blog I will show you day time shots of this most unique community.

Göreme, located among the "fairy chimney" rock formations, is a town in Cappadocia, a historical region of Turkey. It is in the Nevşehir Province in Central Anatolia and has a population of around 2,500 people

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Here is the restaurant that MIke Martin and I ate at. 

 


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